Tag Archives: HiSeq X Ten

Think Big: The UK 100,000 Genome Project

In late 2012 the 100,000 genome project was launched. UK Prime Minister David Cameron announced a new initiative led by the National Health Service to sequence the genomes of up to 100,000 people and to use their genomic information in treatment and studies of cancer and other diseases. The government set aside 100 million GBP for this project.

hiseq-x-tenGenomics England which is heading the project now named 10 firms that have been selected to for the assessment of the next phase of the project. The companies are Congenica; Diploid; NantOmics; Genomics Ltd.; Illumina; Qiagen; Lockheed Martin; NextCode Health; Omicia; and Personalis.

As part of the recently completed stage, Genomics England in February sent out a questionnaire to 28 participants in relation to 10 cancer/normal samples and 15 rare disease trio samples.

Illumina is partnering as well and will contribute with the ultra-high throughput sequencing platform HiSeq XTM Ten.

What will be the next step? Sequencing everyone?

More Updates: Illumina & IonTorrent

Quarter 4 of 2014 seems to be another exciting one for Next Generation Sequencing. Beside the chemistry update for PacBio RSII also Illumina and IonTorrent / ThermoFisher announced two major improvements / achievements:

  • Chemistry update for the Illumina HiSeq X Ten and the HiSeq 2500 Rapid Run
    The new v2 reagent kit for the HiSeq X Ten supports a PCR-free sample preparation kit, which eliminates amplification during the library preparation. So far only sample preparation kits with PCR were possible, which sometimes results in a lower quality of challeging genomic regions.
    The new v2 reagent kit for the HiSeq 2500 enables users to sequence 2x 250 bp and the new chemistry therefore delivers up to 300 Gbp of data in only 60 hours. (Press Release)
    To my opinion Illumina proves once more that NGS is highly dynamic and that their continous update for existing systems is the key for their success (the latest financial report confirms that Q3 of 2014 with a growth of 10% is the strongest since 2011 for Illumina (Fierce Medical Devices)).
  • IonTorrent goes diagnostic
    The Ion PGM Dx System is now also CE-Marked for in vitro diagnostic (IVD) use in Europe. Thermo Fisher Scientific believes that the CE-mark “will enable European clinical laboratories to more easily […] implement new […] diagnostic assays” (Press Release).
    In September they announced already that the PGM is now listed with the U.S. FDA as a Class II Medical Device.
    To my opinion the clearance for diagnostic use in Europe as well as in the U.S. will further strengthen the position of the Ion PGM in clinical laboratories.

Large genome sequencing studies in the USA

senior-asian-woman-100226669The launch of the Illumina HiSeq X Ten enabled them to put in practice their plans and great visions. I’m speaking of two persons of great influence in the United States. This year, Dr. J. Craig Venter, known for being one of the first to sequence the human genome and Patrick Soon-Shiong, considered as the world’s richest doctor, both revealed some details about their large scale sequencing projects:

  • J. Craig Venter founded the company Human Longevity that aims to develop treatments for cancer and age-related conditions. To unveil the mechanisms how people can live long and healthy lifes, the company will become one of the largest DNA sequencing facilities in the world. The plan is to set up a sequencing center that is capable of sequencing 40,000 human genomes a year.
  • Patrick Soon-Shiong recently announced that his company NantHealth is purchasing sequencers being able to sequence 22,000 genomes annually. The samples will derive from the 22,000 patients diagnosed with cancer annually at the 34 hospitals owned by Providence Health & Services. Consequently, the company from Soon-Shiong probably will become the first one using their sequencing capacity for clinical sequencing on a large scale.

Such huge collections of sequencing data make it possible to uncover the molecular causes of an complex process as aging or such a diverse and complex disease as cancer in a general approach. Big and very valuable databases will be created, that may contribute to develop new pharmaceuticals or develop personalized therapies.