Whole genome sequencing a complete island

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coat_of_arms_of_Iceland.svg

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coat_of_arms_of_Iceland.svg

Two days ago a groundbreaking study was published in Nature Genetics: Whole genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and Genotyping of 104,220 Icelanders.

The advantage of using a small population like the Icelanders for this kind of study is that there are fewer rare variants, but sometimes also a higher occurance of some of these variants.

For the study, geenomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells and subsequent sequencing was performed on GAIIx and HiSeq instruments. The resulting reads were aligned to the human reference genome (NCBI Build 36 (hg18).

Gudbjartsson et al. then examined the data from different angles. For example, they looked for geographical dependencies for specific variants or how the data can be used to learn more about phenotypes and their underlying genomic pattern. But they also report an example “how rare variants […] can be used to analyze clinical problems”. (Gudbjartsson et. al)

Since every human being has a unique genomic pattern I think studies like this are of high importance to learn more about disease related genotypes. This will help to gain confidence in the results that we get from molecular diagnostic assays for disease treatment now and in the future.

Read the complete publication here.

Stephanie Engel

About Stephanie Engel

Stephie's motto: NGS rules. She is thrilled by molecular diagnostics.

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